Emergency rescues

This country is one of the best places in the world for the observation of free roaming wildlife, and recognized for its long terms scientific researches (lion study in Serengeti National Park by Craig Parker, 60 years studies of Chimpanzees in Gombe by doctor Jane Goodall) and their involvement to fight against elephant poaching. Unfortunately, Tanzania accuses a major delay regarding rescue of animals.  

Millions of dollars are invested in the conservation of endangered species and human-wildlife conflicts, however, there has yet to be financing to build sanctuaries to welcome endangered and/or distressed animals. Two teams (Kilimanjaro Animal Crew and Every Living Thing) located in the region of Arusha and Dar es Salaam, however, are trying to initiate a change in mentalities, making Tanzanian authorities awareness to the respect for animals as an individual, and by showing that their structures are the most appropriate solutions to wild and domestic animals in distress in the country.

IN TANZANIA, ZOOS AND QUARANTINE FACILITIES ARE THE ONLY PLACES OF DETENTION FOR WILD ANIMALS IN AN IRREGULAR SITUATION.

There, the conditions of detention are very far even from the lowest standards of welfare.  

Those places don’t respect any animal welfare freedoms decided by law in the Animal Welfare act of Tanzania.  They are ruined, dangerous for the animals and for the visitors. Far from the current new standards that arise everywhere.   

In mission of investigation in zoos in Tanzania, we have noticed many infractions to the law and have witnessed animals in a very bad condition. The creation of this network is the first step to move forward on the question of the animal well-being in tanzanian zoos and recreational facilities everywhere where animals are kept captiv.

To face this observation,

joins forces with EVERY LIVING THING and MAKOA today to build A NEW MODEL FOR A SAFEGUARD CENTER, to host and rehabilitate wild animals injured or held in poor conditions, and to change the laws and attitudes towards animals in Tanzania.

Our first three emergencies

Many animals are waiting every day to be saved from the deplorable conditions in which they try to survive … Only, the cruel lack of means is a brake on the release of these captive animals and all those who are in distress in the country. Thus, at first HISA, EVERY LIVING THING AND MAKOA, answer the first three cases which seemed to them the most urgent :

 

MAKOA, IT IS 70 HA OF AVAILABLE LAND !

Yet funding is lacking to build pens adapted to their residents. This is particularly the case for Jack, a young cheetah found in a private area in Namalok (Tanzania), who lives today confined in an enclosure of a few square meters … 

Hungry, wounded by arrows and many fractures, Jack had to get too close to the village areas. Too little to be anesthetized, he was first fed three days on the spot before being transported to the shelter by the two veterinarians of the Kilimanjaro Animal crew with officers from Tanzania’s national parks. 

JJack can not go back to the wild for the moment. He must first recover from his injuries, rebuild his muscles, undermined by months of forced captivity.

WE WISH TO BUILD HIM A “SAVANE TRANSITION”. A HUGE ENCLOSURE, WHERE BARBARA, ANIMAL BEHAVIORIST, WILL DO EVERYTHING TO REACH HIM TO HUNT AND TO RELEASE HIM IN NATURE ONE DAY.
NUMEROUS PRIMATES, VICTIMS OF MALTRAITANCES, TRAFFICKING, OR CONFLICTS WITH MAN, ALSO WAIT FOR THEIR FREEDOM TO BE RECOVERED.

For this, it is necessary to build large enclosure and adapted to their needs, in order to rehabilitate them to the wild.

This is notably the case of Matze, a baboon who has been living in MAKOA since he was three months. A family who found him hanging on to his murdered mother, decided to keep him, without realizing the consequences of such an adoption … When the mother became pregnant, the doctors advised her to separate from the baboon. However, it was too late to release Matze, already too impregnated with humans. Then, he arrived at the farm, and lived until he was 2 years old with other monkeys in a large enclosure, until it became too big and dangerous. Since January 2018, because of a lack of funding, Matze lives confined in a room of observation, and seems more and more depressed …

A GREATEST ENCLOSURE COULD PERMIT US TO REHABILITATE MATZE TO THE WILD. AND AFTER RESCUING OTHER BABOUINS, WE COULD RELEASE THEM ALL TOGETHER WHEN THE MOMENT WILL BE COMING.
DAR ES SALAAM IS A HUB FOR THE PARROT ILLEGAL TRADE

The Tanzanian government is permanently recovering parrots, following the dismantling of the illegal trade channels, but does not have the aviaries necessary to receive them properly. Rangers keep these birds in unhealthy cages. Stressed and under-nourished, parrots die or are resold.

Since 1975, more than 3.5 million parrots have been caught in the wild in order to be sold commercially. Unfortunately, international trade is often used as a cover for traffic. Some emblematic species, such as the african grey parrot, are now endangered in nature because of the trapping and degradation of their habitat.

IN SOME PARTS OF THE AFRICAN CONTINENT, THE NUMBER OF GRAY PARROTS HAS REDUCED BY 99%.

Our goal is to receive parrots with the agreement of the Tanzanian government, and to set up a rehabilitation process on the MAKOA farm. Veterinarians and behavioralists from the Kilimanjaro Animal Crew Team, with appropriate captive conditions (aviaries with appropriate fortifications, quarantine area, and veterinary care), will successfully reintroduce these birds into protected government forests, located on the slopes of Kilimanjaro.

A big thank you to our first donors for participating in our crowdfunding campaign! Thanks to their support, we were able to raise 1910 €, we are now able to realize the first aviaries for gray parrots victims of the illegal trade.

Thank you to :

Jean Philippe Bénier, Alexandra Maillet, Dorothée Maydieu, Nicolas Drivas, Bianca Abbandonato, Stéphanie Cassar, Léa Comte, Fabienne Desjardin, Zoé Scano, Elise Gautrin, Sophie Penaud, Marijo Darmon, Christophe Cousin, Sabine Townson, Christophe Babola, Chantal Rispal, Mathieu Berthelot, Emilia Correia, Laurence Delauneux, Jade Dauvilliers, Marie Claire Alves and Mathias Lavaux.

DO YOU WANT TO HELP US?